Can You Guess This Building? Series No. 10

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 10:

The clues to this building’s use are in its marble and terra cotta ornament. It was designed by the firm of Graham, Anderson, Probst and White, and completed in 1930. Where is it?

 

Answer: Shedd Aquarium, Chicago, IL. This indoor public aquarium was once the largest in the world, holding over five million gallons of water. The building’s Beaux Arts style complements neighboring buildings on the Museum Campus Chicago.

 

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Photos by Vertical Access. Read more about our involvement with the Shedd Aquarium here.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 9

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 9:

This challenge takes us to Canada. Originally built as a bank, this 12-story building’s upper floors are clad in terra cotta glazed to match the granite base. Perhaps you’ll recognize the iconic modern office tower in the background. Where is it?

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Answer: One King Street West, Toronto, Ontario. Originally built as the Dominion Bank Building in 1914, this building was later converted to a hotel and condominiums. In the background of the first photo is Canada’s tallest building, First Canadian Place.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 8

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 8:

This Romanesque Revival academic building was completed in 1893, by the Chicago firm of Patton & Fisher. It contrasts with the many (famous) modernist buildings nearby. Where is it?

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Answer: Illinois Institute of Technology, Main Building, Chicago, Illinois. The Main Building was one of the earliest buildings constructed for the Armour Institute, a precursor to the Illinois Institute of Technology. It contrasts with the many nearby Modernist buildings by Mies van der Rohe. The entire main campus, including the Main Building, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 7

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 7:

Gargoyles and turrets abound on this monumental government building, constructed just before the turn of the twentieth century to house several federal agencies under one roof. In which city on the shores of Lake Michigan is this building located?

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Answer: U.S. Courthouse and Federal Office Building, Milwaukee, WI. This Romanesque Revival building was designed by Willoughby J. Edbrooke, Supervising Architect of the U.S. Treasury. It originally housed a post office, courts and U.S. Customs office. Today, the only original remaining tenant is the United States District Court.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 7

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 7:

This 25-foot-tall beauty stands atop one of the largest government buildings in the world, a Beaux Arts masterpiece completed in 1914. She holds a five-sectioned mural crown in her left hand, and a shield and laurel branch in her right. Where is this “fame”-ous statue?

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Answer: David N. Dinkins Municipal Building, New York, NY. Built to house an expanded city government following the consolidation of the five boroughs in 1898, it was the first skyscraper produced by the firm of McKim, Mead and White. The gilded copper statue atop its cupola is Civic Fame, by sculptor Adolph Weinman. The building was renamed for former Mayor David N. Dinkins in November 2015 in recognition of his decades of public service including a four-year term as mayor.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 6

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 6:

This 25-foot-tall beauty stands atop one of the largest government buildings in the world, a Beaux Arts masterpiece completed in 1914. She holds a five-sectioned mural crown in her left hand, and a shield and laurel branch in her right. Where is this “fame”-ous statue?

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Screen Shot 2015-05-22 at 12.07.05 PM

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Answer: David N. Dinkins Municipal Building, New York, NY. Built to house an expanded city government following the consolidation of the five boroughs in 1898, it was the first skyscraper produced by the firm of McKim, Mead and White. The gilded copper statue atop its cupola is Civic Fame, by sculptor Adolph Weinman. The building was renamed for former Mayor David N. Dinkins in November 2015 in recognition of his decades of public service including a four-year term as mayor.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 6

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 6:

These terra cotta faces keep watch over a state capitol from atop what was once the tallest building between New York and Chicago. The building was originally called the “Citadel” and the classically-inspired ornamental motifs include shields, eagles, fasces and medallions. Where is it?

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Answer: LeVeque Tower, Columbus, Ohio. This Art Deco skyscraper was built in 1927 by the American Insurance Union and originally known as the AIU Citadel. The architect, C. Howard Crane, is best known as a designer of movie palaces. In 1945, the building was purchased by John Lincoln and Leslie L. LeVeque, inventor of the automatic pinsetter used in bowling alleys.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 5

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 5:

These terra cotta faces keep watch over a state capitol from atop what was once the tallest building between New York and Chicago. The building was originally called the “Citadel” and the classically-inspired ornamental motifs include shields, eagles, fasces and medallions. Where is it?

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Answer: LeVeque Tower, Columbus, Ohio. This Art Deco skyscraper was built in 1927 by the American Insurance Union and originally known as the AIU Citadel. The architect, C. Howard Crane, is best known as a designer of movie palaces. In 1945, the building was purchased by John Lincoln and Leslie L. LeVeque, inventor of the automatic pinsetter used in bowling alleys.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 4

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 4:

These sculpted limestone panels were spotted during a tower investigation of an early twentieth-century church. You’ll need binoculars to see them in person, since they’re about 80 feet above the sidewalk.

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 This church’s architect liked the building so much that he chose it as his final resting place. Where is this lovely bell tower?
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Answer: Church of the Intercession, New York City. Designed by Bertram Goodhue, the Church of the Intercession was originally built as a chapel of Trinity Church on the site of Trinity’s cemetery in Harlem. Goodhue’s burial vault, sculpted by Lee Lawrie, depicts Goodhue surrounded by images of several of his most famous buildings. In the adjacent cemetery, one can find the burial monuments of John James Audubon and many other famous New Yorkers.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 3

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 3: A Richardsonian Clock Tower

The materials, round arches, and façade treatment of this building are unmistakably Richardsonian Romanesque, and the prominent clock tower marks this as a civic building. The majority of Henry Hobson Richardson’s work can be found in New England, with quite a few buildings in New York and Pennsylvania as well. This building’s host city is home to another, even more well-known Richardson building. Where is it?

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Answer: Albany City Hall. Vertical Access has worked at both of Albany’s H.H. Richardson public buildings – City Hall and the New York State Capitol.

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Photos by Vertical Access.