Can you identify this building? – Series No. 5

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 5:

These terra cotta faces keep watch over a state capitol from atop what was once the tallest building between New York and Chicago. The building was originally called the “Citadel” and the classically-inspired ornamental motifs include shields, eagles, fasces and medallions. Where is it?

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Answer: LeVeque Tower, Columbus, Ohio. This Art Deco skyscraper was built in 1927 by the American Insurance Union and originally known as the AIU Citadel. The architect, C. Howard Crane, is best known as a designer of movie palaces. In 1945, the building was purchased by John Lincoln and Leslie L. LeVeque, inventor of the automatic pinsetter used in bowling alleys.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 4

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 4:

These sculpted limestone panels were spotted during a tower investigation of an early twentieth-century church. You’ll need binoculars to see them in person, since they’re about 80 feet above the sidewalk.

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 This church’s architect liked the building so much that he chose it as his final resting place. Where is this lovely bell tower?
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Answer: Church of the Intercession, New York City. Designed by Bertram Goodhue, the Church of the Intercession was originally built as a chapel of Trinity Church on the site of Trinity’s cemetery in Harlem. Goodhue’s burial vault, sculpted by Lee Lawrie, depicts Goodhue surrounded by images of several of his most famous buildings. In the adjacent cemetery, one can find the burial monuments of John James Audubon and many other famous New Yorkers.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 3

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 3: A Richardsonian Clock Tower

The materials, round arches, and façade treatment of this building are unmistakably Richardsonian Romanesque, and the prominent clock tower marks this as a civic building. The majority of Henry Hobson Richardson’s work can be found in New England, with quite a few buildings in New York and Pennsylvania as well. This building’s host city is home to another, even more well-known Richardson building. Where is it?

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Answer: Albany City Hall. Vertical Access has worked at both of Albany’s H.H. Richardson public buildings – City Hall and the New York State Capitol.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 2

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 2: The “Cathedral of Presbyterianism”

A very modern grotesque was spotted high up on this nineteenth-century church with an impressive address. Some of the badly-deteriorated original stone carvings were replaced in the 1990s, which is when we suspect this fellow appeared. It may be a self-portrait by the stonecarver, a tradition that dates back to the construction of medieval cathedrals in Europe.

This brownstone church is often referred to as the “Cathedral of Presbyterianism.” The iconic hotel in the background is another good clue! Where is it? Scroll down for the answer.

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Answer: Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church, New York City. Completed in 1875, the church was designed by Carl Pfeiffer and is the largest Presbyterian sanctuary in Manhattan. Across the street is the 1904 St. Regis Hotel, also pictured above.

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Photos by Vertical Access.

Can you identify this building? – Series No. 1

Test your knowledge of historic and iconic buildings in the U.S. (and beyond!) in this series of “guess the building” blog posts.

Series No. 1: A Neoclassical “Temple of Liberty”

This iconic building has undergone several expansion campaigns since construction first began in the eighteenth century. It now contains over 600 rooms totaling 1.5 million square feet of space, and it is visited by millions of people annually. Where is this remarkable building? Scroll down for the answer.

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Answer:  The United States Capitol in Washington, D.C. Built in stages under the supervision of a half-dozen architects, the Capitol is an instantly-recognizable symbol of national identity. The massive cast-iron dome was surveyed by Vertical Access in 2007 and 2010, and is currently undergoing the first major restoration in over 50 years. Click here for more information about the Capitol and the dome restoration.

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U.S. Capitol photo by Jon Reis Photography.

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Photos by Vertical Access except where noted.